DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS: TRAFFIC AND SIGNAL ENGINEERING CONSOLIDATION

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS:
TRAFFIC AND SIGNAL ENGINEERING CONSOLIDATION
Problem Identification:
Traffic and Signal Engineering functions are now spread over four divisions, both inside and outside of the Bureau of Transportation. This causes confusion among City management, outside agencies, and the public.

Recommended Action:
Consolidate Traffic and Signal Engineering functions within the Bureau of Transportation’s Engineering Division.

Classification:
Organizational, Service Improvement

Functional/Operational Area:
Bureau of Transportation

Estimated Annual Impact:
While the immediate financial impact cannot be estimated, implementation should lead to improvements in internal management and constituent services.

Estimated Implementation Costs:
None

Barriers to Implementation:
None

Project Implementation:
90 days

Next Steps:
Space would have to be identified for the two aforementioned sections and their relocation implemented.

Analysis:
The Traffic and Signal Engineering functions and their locations are shown below:

DIVISION FUNCTION
Transportation Engineering Division Review of maintenance of traffic plans, proposed developments and proposed legislation, signals and pavement markings design, map preparation, permit approval, consultant studies and other traffic and safety studies.
Safety Division Truck and bus issues including permitting and
escorting of oversize loads.
Transportation Maintenance Division Traffic and signal warrant studies, sign investigations, traffic counts, accident data collection, signal timing, and permit investigations.
Director’s Office Traffic signal computer and dispatching.
Parking Parking and Loading Zone signs.

Note: Maintenance functions such as sign installation or signal maintenance are not shown and are not proposed for reorganization.

City managers and the public have difficulty determining the appropriate responsible contacts when several seemingly related traffic or signal questions fall in different units. For example, City staff are frequently called upon to attend community meetings, at which concerns relating to truck traffic, missing signs, speed bumps, and signal timing issues are common. Currently, five different Departmental units are assigned responsibility to these types of issues. The proposed change would allow a single organizational unit to address all of these related issues.