GBC hires Robert Hellauer to head transportation and BRAC initiatives

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The Greater Baltimore Committee has named Robert E. Hellauer Jr. as its director of regional transportation and BRAC.

Hellauer, who has more than 20 years of transportation policy development and consulting experience, will direct the GBC’s work on regional transportation issues including the port, airport, highways and transit. His duties will include coordinating GBC work to develop a comprehensive integrated regional transportation system.

“Bob Hellauer brings to the GBC staff a broad knowledge of Maryland’s transportation issues and considerable experience as an advocate in government venues,” said GBC president and CEO Donald C. Fry. “He will be a valuable asset as we work to strengthen our region’s transportation infrastructure and to accommodate anticipated growth related to base realignment and closure and other economic development opportunities emerging in our region.”

Most recently, Hellauer was president of REH & Associates, which provided fundraising strategies and grant writing capabilities for nonprofit entities.

Hellauer was director of government relations at the Maryland Transit Administration from 1994-2003. Before that, he served several years as director of government affairs at the Maryland Port Administration, and four years as an assistant in the Office of the Secretary, Maryland Department of Transportation.

In the 1980s, Hellauer served on the staff of U.S. Senator Charles McC. Mathias, and later was a legislative assistant to then Rep. Barbara A. Mikulski.

Hellauer served on the 2007 transition teams for Governor Martin O’Malley and Howard County Executive Kenneth Ulman.

In 2004, he helped to found Neighbor Ride, Inc., a nonprofit established to provide transportation to the elderly population of Howard County, Md., and currently serves on its board of directors.

Hellauer is a 1980 graduate of the University of Baltimore School of Law. He earned a B.A. from Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1976.

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