Project Overview

MANAGEMENT AND EFFICIENCY PROJECT OVERVIEW
Following his inauguration in December 1999, Baltimore Mayor Martin O’Malley asked the Greater Baltimore Committee, the most prominent organization of business leaders in the region, and the Presidents’ Roundtable, the city’s leading organization of minority CEOs, to jointly conduct business-driven evaluations of five key city government departments.Drawing from a similar strategy employed successfully by Philadelphia, Mayor O’Malley sought to form a partnership with the business community to strengthen Baltimore City’s fiscal management, its operations and the overall efficiency of five key government agencies that account for a combined 53 percent of the City’s net operating budget.In general, for each agency the Mayor requested evaluations and recommendations to help the new administration establish best management practices, reduce costs and increase efficiencies. He also requested assessments of departmental staffing needs, the use of technology and potential out-sourcing opportunities.Some of the key objectives that Mayor O’Malley set for these studies included:
– Evaluation of department mission, objectives, and priorities;
– Review of existing management and operational structures, and an assessment of their value and efficiency;
– Recommendations for strengthening departmental effectiveness and responsiveness;
– Recommendations for measuring departmental performance and for implementing ongoing outcome-based evaluation.

The city agencies identified for study included:
– Department of Public Works
– Department of Housing and Community Development
– Health Department
– Department of Recreation and Parks
– Fire Department

In addition to recommendations for these departments, the study teams recognized the need to provide recommendations for improved management of information technology throughout city government and other general citywide management recommendations, many of which are in the area of budgetary policy and management.

The Greater Baltimore Committee and Presidents’ Roundtable solicited volunteer business executives from the ranks of the Baltimore region’s most successful businesses. Study teams of mostly private-sector volunteer executives and managers were recruited for each of the agencies studied. The five agency study teams and an Information Technology team divided into more than 20 subcommittees to closely examine specific management issues within the agencies.

Each study team was led by private-sector CEOs who are leading members of the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents’ Roundtable. Study teams were aided by some paid consultants where appropriate.

The study process was launched on January 31, 2000 with 150 volunteer executives who met at the Greater Baltimore Committee offices for a project orientation and keynote remarks by David L. Cohen, Esq., chairman of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews and Ingersoll LLP. Cohen served for five years as chief of staff to former Philadelphia Mayor Edward G. Rendell and was the architect of that city’s successful business-community review of city government.

More than 250 volunteer executives from member companies of the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents’ Roundtable ultimately worked on study teams for this project.

The project study received no funding from the city government. The study was funded through contributions from the following sources:

– W.K. Kellogg Foundation
– Greater Baltimore Committee
– Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation
– France-Merrick Foundation
– Abell Foundation
– Baltimore Community FoundationMANAGEMENT AND EFFICIENCY PROJECT OVERVIEW
Following his inauguration in December 1999, Baltimore Mayor Martin O’Malley asked the Greater Baltimore Committee, the most prominent organization of business leaders in the region, and the Presidents’ Roundtable, the city’s leading organization of minority CEOs, to jointly conduct business-driven evaluations of five key city government departments.

Drawing from a similar strategy employed successfully by Philadelphia, Mayor O’Malley sought to form a partnership with the business community to strengthen Baltimore City’s fiscal management, its operations and the overall efficiency of five key government agencies that account for a combined 53 percent of the City’s net operating budget.

In general, for each agency the Mayor requested evaluations and recommendations to help the new administration establish best management practices, reduce costs and increase efficiencies. He also requested assessments of departmental staffing needs, the use of technology and potential out-sourcing opportunities.

Some of the key objectives that Mayor O’Malley set for these studies included:
– Evaluation of department mission, objectives, and priorities;
– Review of existing management and operational structures, and an assessment of their value and efficiency;
– Recommendations for strengthening departmental effectiveness and responsiveness;
– Recommendations for measuring departmental performance and for implementing ongoing outcome-based evaluation.

The city agencies identified for study included:
– Department of Public Works
– Department of Housing and Community Development
– Health Department
– Department of Recreation and Parks
– Fire Department

In addition to recommendations for these departments, the study teams recognized the need to provide recommendations for improved management of information technology throughout city government and other general citywide management recommendations, many of which are in the area of budgetary policy and management.

The Greater Baltimore Committee and Presidents’ Roundtable solicited volunteer business executives from the ranks of the Baltimore region’s most successful businesses. Study teams of mostly private-sector volunteer executives and managers were recruited for each of the agencies studied. The five agency study teams and an Information Technology team divided into more than 20 subcommittees to closely examine specific management issues within the agencies.

Each study team was led by private-sector CEOs who are leading members of the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents’ Roundtable. Study teams were aided by some paid consultants where appropriate.

The study process was launched on January 31, 2000 with 150 volunteer executives who met at the Greater Baltimore Committee offices for a project orientation and keynote remarks by David L. Cohen, Esq., chairman of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews and Ingersoll LLP. Cohen served for five years as chief of staff to former Philadelphia Mayor Edward G. Rendell and was the architect of that city’s successful business-community review of city government.

More than 250 volunteer executives from member companies of the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents’ Roundtable ultimately worked on study teams for this project.

The project study received no funding from the city government. The study was funded through contributions from the following sources:

– W.K. Kellogg Foundation
– Greater Baltimore Committee
– Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation
– France-Merrick Foundation
– Abell Foundation
– Baltimore Community Foundation